Hi, I'm Nocciolina and this is my mess of a blog. Hope you enjoy your stay!

This blog contains:
-Social issues and commentary
-Feminism
- Some of my writing, here and there
-Fandom reblogs (Adventure Time, MLP, Free!, Attack on Titan, RWBY, Roosterteeth, Samurai Flamenco, Kill la Kill, Sailor Moon, Disney stuff, and lots of other things)
-Art that I like
-Writing references
-Music
-NSFW photography.
I tag almost everything in case you wanna blacklist it, but lemme know if I miss stuff.
Also I swear a lot.

 

fandomanon:

Don’t worry Gavin Free I had Adam Ellis help me move your desk.

yamino:

countergrid:

byronpunk:

sphyrn:

rioreia:

tonystarkmakesyoufeel:

mycutefriendsweetprincess:

puddinbun:

princelypaws:

doomburgerdoodles:

ho-ho-my-lad:

feministmagicalgirl:

thecaracoburn:

drbrucebananer:

bluandorange:

spaceconfessional:

wienermeister:

timemagazine:

Beyonce, Robert Redford, Mary Barra and Jason Collins cover the new issue of TIME for the TIME 100. Photo: Paola Kudacki 

Where is Laverne Cox?

Where is Laverne Cox?

Where is Laverne Cox?

Where is Laverne Cox?

Where is Laverne Cox?

Where is Laverne Cox?

Where is Laverne Cox?

Where is Laverne Cox?

Where is Laverne Cox?

Where is Laverne Cox?

Where is Laverne Cox?

Where is Laverne Cox?

Where is Laverne Cox?

Where is Laverne Cox?

Where is Laverne Cox?

Where is Laverne Cox?

Where is Laverne Cox?

Where is Laverne Cox?

yamino:

countergrid:

byronpunk:

sphyrn:

rioreia:

tonystarkmakesyoufeel:

mycutefriendsweetprincess:

puddinbun:

princelypaws:

doomburgerdoodles:

ho-ho-my-lad:

feministmagicalgirl:

thecaracoburn:

drbrucebananer:

bluandorange:

spaceconfessional:

wienermeister:

timemagazine:

Beyonce, Robert Redford, Mary Barra and Jason Collins cover the new issue of TIME for the TIME 100. Photo: Paola Kudacki 

Where is Laverne Cox?

Where is Laverne Cox?

Where is Laverne Cox?

Where is Laverne Cox?

Where is Laverne Cox?

Where is Laverne Cox?

Where is Laverne Cox?

Where is Laverne Cox?

Where is Laverne Cox?

Where is Laverne Cox?

Where is Laverne Cox?

Where is Laverne Cox?

Where is Laverne Cox?

Where is Laverne Cox?

Where is Laverne Cox?

Where is Laverne Cox?

Where is Laverne Cox?

Where is Laverne Cox?

madamateur:

trying to drink hot tea while wearing glasses more like

image

where the fuck did the laptop go

yamino:

danofthetubes:

anemia:

damianoisfamous:

excadrill:

the look

So the internet just gave my tumblr name a whole new (literal) meaning. I was alerted to a photo of me gathering massive attention via a friend who linked me to a Reddit post titled “Don’t worry guys, I’m taking hipster to the next level.”Apparently some guy on the train uploaded this photo to twitter it has been spreading like wildfire since. Surprisingly when I read the thread on Reddit a lot of it was positive/supportive. I’m surprised by how unfazed and genuinely funny I find the negative comments. People’s theories as to why I am dressed like this, and who I really am are also really interesting. I’m dressed like this for a number reasons. Firstly, and fore-mostly, I genuinely like the clothes I am wearing. I’ve described my look as “anywhere from hipster chic to kawaii gangsta Harajuku princess”. This is the epitome of the latter. I love sailor moon, I love pink, those converse are kawaii as fuck and yeah fuck you I’m wearing Prada sunglasses. I don’t really dress like this all the time, but I wish I did more often. I mostly don’t because I want to keep the look fresh. I wore this outfit because I had an art exhibition at my college and wanted to express myself.I also find men’s fashion extremely limiting in both types of clothes, cuts of clothes and colours. Women have so many beautiful options. So I pillage their aisles a lot because I wanna look pretty.This was also a statement. As an artist I think fashion is incredibly important. This day, I wanted something that not only reflected my personality and artistic sensibilities but also have some social commentary. A lot of my work, or what I want my work to speak about, is sex and sexuality and notions of gender and gender roles. How many of you knew pink actually use to be associated with boys, not girls? Personally I think the idea of “This is a boy colour”, “This is a girl colour” or “Barbies are for girls”, “Power Rangers are for boys” is dumb as fuck. Creating social and cultural boundaries does nothing but limit the potential of a person. By dressing like this I am breaking that boundary for myself and attempting to reflect that sentiment.  

an inspiration

Keeps getting better. Rock on, man.


I bet if the person sneaking this photo had just asked, you would have posed and they could have gotten an even nicer pic to post on Reddit. But because they were creepy and probably intended to make fun of your outfit, they had to take a snapshot of your butt. And now I’m mad at them because I would have liked to see the full outfit.

yamino:

danofthetubes:

anemia:

damianoisfamous:

excadrill:

the look


So the internet just gave my tumblr name a whole new (literal) meaning. I was alerted to a photo of me gathering massive attention via a friend who linked me to a Reddit post titled “Don’t worry guys, I’m taking hipster to the next level.”

Apparently some guy on the train uploaded this photo to twitter it has been spreading like wildfire since. Surprisingly when I read the thread on Reddit a lot of it was positive/supportive. I’m surprised by how unfazed and genuinely funny I find the negative comments. People’s theories as to why I am dressed like this, and who I really am are also really interesting. 

I’m dressed like this for a number reasons. Firstly, and fore-mostly, I genuinely like the clothes I am wearing. I’ve described my look as “anywhere from hipster chic to kawaii gangsta Harajuku princess”. This is the epitome of the latter. I love sailor moon, I love pink, those converse are kawaii as fuck and yeah fuck you I’m wearing Prada sunglasses. I don’t really dress like this all the time, but I wish I did more often. I mostly don’t because I want to keep the look fresh. I wore this outfit because I had an art exhibition at my college and wanted to express myself.

I also find men’s fashion extremely limiting in both types of clothes, cuts of clothes and colours. Women have so many beautiful options. So I pillage their aisles a lot because I wanna look pretty.

This was also a statement. As an artist I think fashion is incredibly important. This day, I wanted something that not only reflected my personality and artistic sensibilities but also have some social commentary. A lot of my work, or what I want my work to speak about, is sex and sexuality and notions of gender and gender roles. How many of you knew pink actually use to be associated with boys, not girls? Personally I think the idea of “This is a boy colour”, “This is a girl colour” or “Barbies are for girls”, “Power Rangers are for boys” is dumb as fuck. Creating social and cultural boundaries does nothing but limit the potential of a person. By dressing like this I am breaking that boundary for myself and attempting to reflect that sentiment.  

an inspiration

Keeps getting better. Rock on, man.

I bet if the person sneaking this photo had just asked, you would have posed and they could have gotten an even nicer pic to post on Reddit. But because they were creepy and probably intended to make fun of your outfit, they had to take a snapshot of your butt. And now I’m mad at them because I would have liked to see the full outfit.

(Source: exxxmilitary)

isaia:

blackpowerisforblackmen:

Lupita was recently named the most beautiful by People’s Magazine, and some of their readers expressed their dissatisfaction with this decision  in the comment section. One reader even commented that Lupita didn’t deserve this title because she’s 100% black(she finds women unattractive if they’re 100% black). These comments made me think of the brilliant post made by radicalrebellion: 
White women (non-black women of color included in this as well) become offended and angry when a black woman (especially a dark skinned black woman like Lupita) is depicted as beautiful and worthy of appreciation because it jeopardizes their position as the epitome of beauty and womanhood. Black women are viewed as the antithesis of White beauty and womanhood, these white women are completely apathetic and silent when dark skinned Black women are portrayed as “ugly” and “unlovable” by the mainstream media because they benefit from this oppression. That’s why you never see white supermodels discussing racism and colorism in the fashion industry. However, these readers wouldn’t complain if it were light skinned black women like Halle Berry, Beyonce, or Rihanna (we all know why, hint: colorism). Anyway, congratulations to the ***flawless Lupita for being named the most beautiful!  

This is why this is important.

isaia:

blackpowerisforblackmen:

Lupita was recently named the most beautiful by People’s Magazine, and some of their readers expressed their dissatisfaction with this decision  in the comment section. One reader even commented that Lupita didn’t deserve this title because she’s 100% black(she finds women unattractive if they’re 100% black). These comments made me think of the brilliant post made by radicalrebellion

White women (non-black women of color included in this as well) become offended and angry when a black woman (especially a dark skinned black woman like Lupita) is depicted as beautiful and worthy of appreciation because it jeopardizes their position as the epitome of beauty and womanhood. Black women are viewed as the antithesis of White beauty and womanhood, these white women are completely apathetic and silent when dark skinned Black women are portrayed as “ugly” and “unlovable” by the mainstream media because they benefit from this oppression. That’s why you never see white supermodels discussing racism and colorism in the fashion industry. However, these readers wouldn’t complain if it were light skinned black women like Halle Berry, Beyonce, or Rihanna (we all know why, hint: colorism). Anyway, congratulations to the ***flawless Lupita for being named the most beautiful!  

This is why this is important.

hollabackboston:

roses—and—rue:

Zitkala-Ša, also known as Gertrude Simmons Bonnin, was the most amazing woman you’ve never heard of.
A writer, editor, musician, teacher and political activist, she was born on February 22, 1876 on the Yankton Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Her mother was Sioux and her father, who abandoned the family when she was very young, was European-American.
When she was eight, missionaries came to the res and took Zitkala-Ša along with several other children to the White’s Manual Labor Institute in Wabash, Indiana, one of many such institutions where Native children were forced to assimilate into white American culture. She studied piano and violin and eventually took the place of her teacher when she resigned. When she received her diploma in 1895, she delivered a speech on women’s rights.
She earned a scholarship to Earlham College, where she continued to study music. From 1897-99, she played with the New England Conservatory in Boston and played at the Paris Exposition in 1900. She collaborated with composer William F. Hanson on the world’s first Native American opera, based entirely on Sioux melodies that had previously existed only as oral tradition. She would play the melodies and Hanson transcribed them. The Sun Dance Opera debuted in 1913 to warm reviews, but I can find no recordings of it, and it seems it’s never performed.
Zitkala-Ša also wrote a number of collections of Native American stories and legends. She wrote them in Latin when she was at school and then translated them into English. She was the first Native person to do so in her own words, without a white editor or translator. In addition, she wrote extensively about her schooling and how it left her torn between her Sioux heritage and her assimilation into white culture. Her writings were published in The Atlantic Monthly and in Harper’s and she served as editor for the American Indian Magazine.
Unsurprisingly, most of her writings were political. She was a fierce yet charismatic advocate for Native American rights. Her efforts helped pass the Indian Citizenship Act and the Indian Reorganization Act. Having founded the National Coalition of American Indians, she spent the rest of her life fighting to protect our many indigenous communities from exploitation.
Her accomplishments were incredible- but have you ever heard of her? I had never heard of her either. Just another example of a history-changing woman omitted from the history books.

hollabackboston:

roses—and—rue:

Zitkala-Ša, also known as Gertrude Simmons Bonnin, was the most amazing woman you’ve never heard of.

A writer, editor, musician, teacher and political activist, she was born on February 22, 1876 on the Yankton Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Her mother was Sioux and her father, who abandoned the family when she was very young, was European-American.

When she was eight, missionaries came to the res and took Zitkala-Ša along with several other children to the White’s Manual Labor Institute in Wabash, Indiana, one of many such institutions where Native children were forced to assimilate into white American culture. She studied piano and violin and eventually took the place of her teacher when she resigned. When she received her diploma in 1895, she delivered a speech on women’s rights.

She earned a scholarship to Earlham College, where she continued to study music. From 1897-99, she played with the New England Conservatory in Boston and played at the Paris Exposition in 1900. She collaborated with composer William F. Hanson on the world’s first Native American opera, based entirely on Sioux melodies that had previously existed only as oral tradition. She would play the melodies and Hanson transcribed them. The Sun Dance Opera debuted in 1913 to warm reviews, but I can find no recordings of it, and it seems it’s never performed.

Zitkala-Ša also wrote a number of collections of Native American stories and legends. She wrote them in Latin when she was at school and then translated them into English. She was the first Native person to do so in her own words, without a white editor or translator. In addition, she wrote extensively about her schooling and how it left her torn between her Sioux heritage and her assimilation into white culture. Her writings were published in The Atlantic Monthly and in Harper’s and she served as editor for the American Indian Magazine.

Unsurprisingly, most of her writings were political. She was a fierce yet charismatic advocate for Native American rights. Her efforts helped pass the Indian Citizenship Act and the Indian Reorganization Act. Having founded the National Coalition of American Indians, she spent the rest of her life fighting to protect our many indigenous communities from exploitation.

Her accomplishments were incredible- but have you ever heard of her? I had never heard of her either. Just another example of a history-changing woman omitted from the history books.